About the Safe-D study

Why research vitamin D in young women?

Vitamin D is important for health. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of many chronic health conditions which affect millions of Australians. It is an important health risk for young women with up to 50% of Australian women having suboptimal vitamin D levels. Many evidence gaps exist; there is some uncertainty about the full range of health effects of vitamin D. For example, it is not known what is the best way to achieve and maintain healthy vitamin D levels. The Safe-D study hopes to shed light on many of these important issues.

We are conducting a study to investigate relationships between vitamin D status in young women and a range of health areas including:

  • Muscle and bone health
  • Sun exposure
  • Mental Health
  • Physical activity
  • Allergies
  • Nutrition

We will also assess effective ways to improve vitamin D nutritional status in young women.This project may lead to better education, policies, and strategies to encourage healthy living and improve the wellbeing of Australian women.  The study consists of two seperate components.

 

Participants are:

  1. Female
  2. Between the age of 16 and 25 years old, inclusive.
  3. Living in Victoria, Australia.

 

In part A of the Safe-D study participants:

  • Completed an online questionnaire
  • Were asked to wear a monitor for two weeks that measures sun exposure
  • Visited our study centre for a comprehensive health check

Participants from part A with mild vitamin D deficiency may be invited to participate in part B of the Safe-D study.

In part B participants were:

  • Randomly assigned to one of three different methods to increase vitamin D levels over a 12 month period.  Each group uses a different way of increasing vitamin D levels, so the researchers can study which way is the safest and most effective.
  • Completed an online questionnaire
  • Were asked to wear a sun monitor for two weeks that measures sun exposure
  • Visited our study centre for a comprehensive health check
Voluntary Participation

Participation in the Safe-D study is voluntary. Consent may be withdrawn at any point in time.

Who is supporting the study?

The Safe-D study is funded by a research grant provided by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).

The study is being conducted by a team of researchers and health professionals from various institutions including:

  • The University of Melbourne
  • The Royal Melbourne Hospital
  • The Royal Women’s Hospital
  • Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

 

For more information about the Safe-D study team click here .